Reusing old canvases

Reusing old canvases
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The wind on Mars is an artist, or at least it tries really hard to be one. It flutters up and down mountains, winding along valleys, dragging its wings in the sand and building up really amazing structures that could win any sand sculpture award. Well okay maybe I’m a little biased. Like this 0.92×1.325

Dune trails

Dune trails
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There’s so much going on in this 0.75×0.75 km (0.47×0.47 mi) image. You’re looking at a broad dune migrating toward the upper right. It’s early summer, but this is close enough to the north pole that some winter ice lingers (pale blueish white), amid slumps that have shed down from the dune. The slumps probably

Fuzzy dunes

Fuzzy dunes
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A Piece of Mars: The dunes (or maybe they’re ripples) in this valley appear to be fuzzy (the view is 625×775 m, 0.39×0.48 mi). They’re not really fuzzy, but it’s not actually clear what’s going on. They seem to have smaller ripples superposed on them, and maybe bright dust has settled into the troughs between

The corpse of a dune

A Piece of Mars: The rippled darker patch in this 600×600 m (0.37×0.37 mi) scene is the former site of a sand dune. This is one of a few “dune corpses” found just upwind of a dune field in Holden crater. The dunes are migrating to the south and east – you can see that

Cross-strata or not?

A Piece of Mars: Sand dunes are one of the few sedimentary phenomena that leave behind layers that aren’t horizontal. They tend to have a characteristic lean to them (and we call them cross-strata). So when I see something that looks like tilted layers on Mars, I take notice. This 0.625×0.5 km (0.39×0.31 mi) scene

Dunes in a colorful hole

A Piece of Mars: Gray dunes have migrated over reddish rock, moving toward a narrowing cleft surrounded by tall tan cliffs. Bright lines on the dunes are exposed internal layers (bones of the dunes, really) that show you where the lee-side slopes once were (so you can tell they’ve moved to the left). The cliffs

The trail of a dune

A Piece of Mars: A low, broad dune occupies the center of this 800×450 m (0.5×0.28 mi) scene, blown by a dominant wind towards the lower left. The slip face on the lee side has several small avalanches, formed as the slope oversteepens (this is how dunes crawl along the surface). Upwind, among other fainter

Fossil dunes

A Piece of Mars: This 1.92×1.08 km (1.19x 0.67 mi) scene shows eroded ridges that are, in fact, lithified dunes. They are so old that you might not recognize them as dunes without more context. This doesn’t happen much on Earth, where inactive dunes are quickly eroded, buried, and/or destroyed by other geologic processes, so