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The martian wind is a geologist
Published 10/18/2018 in Lori Fenton's Blog Author lfenton
Right now, the Fourth Landing Site Workshop for the Mars 2020 rover mission is happening. It's the last one, and in a few hours the scientists attending the workshop will vote on which of four sites they think the rover should land. I love the geology, but mostly I love one little corner of geology: where the rocks meet the atmosphere. I like how studying the rocks can teach us about how the atmosphere, and therefore the climate, has changed over time on Mars. There are signs of windblown things pretty much anywhere you look on Mars, and since none of... read more ❯

Reusing old canvases
Published 4/23/2018 in Lori Fenton's Blog Author lfenton
The wind on Mars is an artist, or at least it tries really hard to be one. It flutters up and down mountains, winding along valleys, dragging its wings in the sand and building up really amazing structures that could win any sand sculpture award. Well okay maybe I'm a little biased. Like this 0.92x1.325 km (0.57x0.82 mi) view (click to see the detail, it's worth it): HiRISE ESP_054171_1605, NASA/JPL/Univ. of Arizona A while back (maybe a million years or so), the wind blew sediment from the lower right to upper left, leaving behind some long, thin ripple-like things we call TARs.... read more ❯

My 2018 paper on recent climate change in Meridiani Planum, Mars (Part 1)
Published 4/11/2018 in Lori Fenton's Blog Author lfenton
Today a big thing happened: a paper I've spent a year or so working on has finally been published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets (which we just call "JGR Planets"). Scientists write a lot of papers, so it's not as momentous as, say, graduating (or watching a student graduate), but it's still a really nice feeling. I can now download a PDF of the paper, look at all the pretty formatting, lovely figures and tables, pages of analysis and what I hope will turn out to be insightful discussion, and say "Yeah, I did that, and with some... read more ❯

Dune trails deep in Hebes Chasma, Mars
Published 3/19/2018 in Lori Fenton's Blog Author lfenton
A few weeks ago I wrote about dunes leaving behind trails near the north pole of Mars. They do this in a few other places as well, but it's not very common. Below is a rare example, this time on the floor of Hebes Chasma (one of the Valles Marineris), which is a tectonically-opened hole in the ground that's about 6 km deep. I don't mean to repeat the same topic, but geologists are usually drawn to terrain that so plainly lays out the geological story of an area, and obvious dune-generated layers are pretty rare. (Also pretty.) (HiRISE ESP_045586_1585, NASA/JPL/Univ.... read more ❯

Athena Coustenis, Professional Status
Published 3/16/2018 in Athena Coustenis Author Athena Coustenis
www.coustenisplanetologist.com/#FullCV read more ❯

Athena Coustenis, Full Curriculum Vitae
Published 11/27/2017 in Athena Coustenis Author Athena Coustenis
www.coustenisplanetologist.com/#FullCV read more ❯

List of publications
Published 11/26/2017 in Athena Coustenis Author Athena Coustenis
www.coustenisplanetologist.com/ScienceNotes.html#PublicationsFullList read more ❯

Intriguing pair of satellites caught with the eVscope
Published 11/23/2017 in Franck Marchis Blog Author Franck Marchis
If you often look at the evening dark sky in a clear area far away from the city, you have probably seen a speck of light which moves with respect to the star, that's probably a distant satellite that shines because it reflects the light of the sun at high altitude. According to NASA's Orbital Debris Program office, there are an  about 21,000 large debris (>10 cm) and satellites orbiting around Earth right now, so much more than you can see with your naked eye. The eVscope is designed to pinpoint and image Deep Sky Objects (nebulae, galaxies), but we have already shown its... read more ❯

1,500th telescope on our Kickstarter. Thank you!
Published 11/21/2017 in Franck Marchis Blog Author Franck Marchis
We have just passed the pledge of our 1,500th telescope on our Kickstarter campaign. With such an amazing number of eVscopes soon to be in operation around the planet, our Campaign Mode and Citizen Science applications will be extraordinary exciting and revolutionary! Your support has brought us to this truly amazing moment, and all we can say is thank you. After so many questions about planets and requests for additional photos, we felt the need to conduct new observations—and despite bad weather in parts of the Northern Hemisphere, we managed to do it! As you check out these pictures, please keep... read more ❯

Unistellar Signs Up More Than 1,200 Early-adopters for its Revolutionary eVscope Confirming the Public Interest for Citizen Science Astronomy
Published 11/9/2017 in Franck Marchis Blog Author Franck Marchis
Unistellar Signs Up More Than 1,200 Early-adopters for its Revolutionary eVscope Confirming the Public Interest for Citizen Science Astronomy San Francisco & Marseille, November 9, 2017. Unistellar, a startup that’s committed to restore the joy of night-sky viewing to people all over the globe, is off to a strong start thanks to the massive success of its recent Kickstarter campaign. The campaign gave supporters the opportunity to order an eVscope, a revolutionary, electronics-based telescope that offers unprecedented views of distant objects in the night sky. The device also allows users to make significant contributions to science by joining observing efforts led by... read more ❯

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