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List of publications
Published 11/26/2017 in Athena Coustenis Author Athena Coustenis
www.coustenisplanetologist.com/ScienceNotes.html#PublicationsFullList read more ❯

Intriguing pair of satellites caught with the eVscope
Published 11/23/2017 in Franck Marchis Blog Author Franck Marchis
If you often look at the evening dark sky in a clear area far away from the city, you have probably seen a speck of light which moves with respect to the star, that's probably a distant satellite that shines because it reflects the light of the sun at high altitude. According to NASA's Orbital Debris Program office, there are an  about 21,000 large debris (>10 cm) and satellites orbiting around Earth right now, so much more than you can see with your naked eye. The eVscope is designed to pinpoint and image Deep Sky Objects (nebulae, galaxies), but we have already shown its... read more ❯

1,500th telescope on our Kickstarter. Thank you!
Published 11/21/2017 in Franck Marchis Blog Author Franck Marchis
We have just passed the pledge of our 1,500th telescope on our Kickstarter campaign. With such an amazing number of eVscopes soon to be in operation around the planet, our Campaign Mode and Citizen Science applications will be extraordinary exciting and revolutionary! Your support has brought us to this truly amazing moment, and all we can say is thank you. After so many questions about planets and requests for additional photos, we felt the need to conduct new observations—and despite bad weather in parts of the Northern Hemisphere, we managed to do it! As you check out these pictures, please keep... read more ❯

Unistellar Signs Up More Than 1,200 Early-adopters for its Revolutionary eVscope Confirming the Public Interest for Citizen Science Astronomy
Published 11/9/2017 in Franck Marchis Blog Author Franck Marchis
Unistellar Signs Up More Than 1,200 Early-adopters for its Revolutionary eVscope Confirming the Public Interest for Citizen Science Astronomy San Francisco & Marseille, November 9, 2017. Unistellar, a startup that’s committed to restore the joy of night-sky viewing to people all over the globe, is off to a strong start thanks to the massive success of its recent Kickstarter campaign. The campaign gave supporters the opportunity to order an eVscope, a revolutionary, electronics-based telescope that offers unprecedented views of distant objects in the night sky. The device also allows users to make significant contributions to science by joining observing efforts led by... read more ❯

A few more pictures of astronomical targets seen with the eVscope
Published 11/8/2017 in Franck Marchis Blog Author Franck Marchis
We got a lot of requests for additional pictures of astronomical targets taken with the eVscope. Here some of them taken recently. One nebula, one galaxy, one planet in our solar system and our moon.... Enjoy!   Saturn observed from Nairobi, Kenya with a numerical zoom x150 on October 29 2017.... read more ❯

Seeing the long-period Comet C/2017 O1 with the new eVscope
Published 11/3/2017 in Franck Marchis Blog Author Franck Marchis
You’ve probably heard of C/2017 O1, a long-period comet that’s now paying what may well be its first-ever visit to the inner solar system. Earlier this month we decided to check it out using our eVscope prototype. The All Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) system discovered Comet O1 ASAS-SN (now officially named C/2017 O1) on July 19, 2017, when it was in the constellation Cetus and had only a faint 15.3 magnitude. Even at that dim magnitude, however, an eVscope pointed at this area of the sky could... read more ❯

It’s Official! The eVscope from Unistellar Gets Kickstarted
Published 10/28/2017 in Franck Marchis Blog Author Franck Marchis
Marseille, France & San Francisco, CA – October 25, 2017 – Imagine being able to see galaxies, nebulae, and asteroids and discovering the sky from your own backyard while participating in scientific investigations. Unistellar has launched a Kickstarter campaign for its eVscope, a powerful telescope that will give the sky back to all of us. The Unistellar eVscope was first presented at the CES in 2017 and recently won the Innovation Award in the Tech For a Better World product category for the CES 2018. During the summer 2017, the Unistellar team has shown the telescope capabilities to thousands of people in Europe... read more ❯

Sidewalk Astronomy at Pier 17 in San Francisco on October 24 2017
Published 10/20/2017 in Franck Marchis Blog Author Franck Marchis
See the universe from Pier 17 in San Francisco with Unistellar eVscope! SETI Institute astronomer Franck Marchis will be there to demo the prototype. Join us on Tuesday, October 24, 2017, starting at 7:30 pm at Pier 17 (the building adjacent to Pier 15 the Exploratorium). We will share views through our evScope and other telescopes of nebulae, galaxies, star clusters, double stars, and other objects visible in the night sky (weather permitted of course). Check our Facebook  and Twitter social media pages for regular updates during the evening. When: Tuesday, October 24 at 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM Where: 17 Pier 17, San... read more ❯

Wavy dunes and straight dunes
Published 10/9/2017 in Lori Fenton's Blog Author lfenton
A Piece of Mars: The dunes here are ~40 m (131 ft) apart and ~200 m (219 yd) long. (They're not really dunes, but rather a windblown thing nearly unique to Mars that we call TARs.) Look carefully and you'll see that some have very straight crests, like a sword - this is typical for TARs. But others have wavy crestlines, like huge serrated knives. Why are some wavy while others are straight? My guess is that the straight-crested TARs formed first. TARs are known for being immobile. The wind forms them, and then they just stop moving, unlike dunes... read more ❯

The crazy laciness of martian TARs
Published 9/25/2017 in Lori Fenton's Blog Author lfenton
A Piece of Mars: Take a look at the windblown stuff in this 0.55x0.625 km (0.34x0.39 mi) scene. Those are intricate patterns of a sort of dune-ripple thing that forms all over on Mars, but not so much on Earth. We call them TARs (transverse aeolian ridges, here are some other examples) because we're still not sure what they are: dunes or ripples or something else? They're beautiful, they reflect wind patterns in ways we don't yet understand, and they might make up a large part of the martian sedimentary rock record. Be glad it's not your job to try... read more ❯