Buried by ejecta

A Piece of Mars: To see this one well you’ll have to click on the image. At the lower right, a 240 m (787 ft) diameter crater formed when a bolide hit the surface, throwing out ejecta on the surrounding terrain. Zooming in, you can see that the ejecta has a distinctive rough surface. Farther

The mysterious bright streaks

A Piece of Mars: Some things just go unexplained (so far, anyway). Here’s a mysterious bright streak (scene is 1.2×1.8 km, 0.75×1.12 mi) concentrated between two sets of ripple-like bedforms. It looks sort of like a river, but it’s on flat terrain and it’s not water. It’s part of a larger set of bright streaks

Dunes in a row

A Piece of Mars: Look at the alignment of the ~100 m dunes in this 713×750 m (0.44×0.47 mi) scene. How do dunes form in such straight lines? And why don’t they always do that? It’s likely that these dunes were once long ridges stretching from the lower right to upper left. The shape of

Ripples of rock

A Piece of Mars: To the upper right of this 0.85×0.6 km (0.53×0.37 mi) scene is a flat-lying plain strewn with large ripples. To the lower left is a rugged hill with gray rock laced with white veins (this might be part of an impact megabreccia identified nearby in Holden crater). Notice that some of

Full Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Athena Coustenis LESIA (Bat. 18) Observatoire de Meudon 5, place Jules Janssen 92195 Meudon Cedex France Athena.Coustenis@obspm.fr Born in Athens, Greece. French and Greek citizenship. Professional status: Athena Coustenis is Director of Research 1st class with the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) of France, working at Paris Observatory in Meudon. Her specialty is

astrobiologist

What is an astrobiologist? I came to Astrobiology quite early in my research. How could I miss the implications ‘Titan: the frozen Earth’, ‘organic chemistry closest to our planet’, the ‘methane cycle mimicking the water cycle on Earth’, etc. Of course, ancient Greek philosophers (them again !) had already thought of a universe consisting of