Latest Posts

What on Mars?

ESP_037161_1785_1.0xA piece of Mars: What on Mars is this (the scene is 600×450 m, or 0.37×0.28 mi)? It can be hard to tell. The lines are ridges of windblown dunes or ripples, the dark gray stuff is active sand blowing between the dunes, and the underlying bedrock is pale tan. But if your eyes can’t make sense of it all, just sit back and enjoy the pretty patterns of Mars. (HiRISE ESP_037161_1785, NASA/JPL/Univ. of Arizona)

Small dunes up high, big dunes down low

ESP_036795_1760_0.331xA piece of Mars: This 1018×1352 m (0.63×0.84 mi) dune-covered scene has split topography: the the bottom part is up on a plateau, and the upper part is in a broad valley. The dunes up on the plateau are smaller than the ones in the valley. Why? Probably because there was more mobile dune-building sediment in the valley to begin with: the dunes up high ran out of material and stopped growing, but the ones in the valley kept getting bigger. (HiRISE ESP_036795_1760, NASA/JPL/Univ. of Arizona)

Summery dune

ESP_035997_2565_0.38xA piece of Mars: Last December I blogged about a picture of a sand dune taken in early northern spring. This is the same dune, without frost, now that summer has come to the northern hemisphere and all the frost is gone. It’s quite a difference. Apparently the dunes are controlled by ice in the winter and by the wind in the summer. (HiRISE ESP_035997_2565, NASA/JPL/Univ. of Arizona)

Is Generation Y Lost?

Here is another off the wall blog. You won’t find any physics in here…

Is GenY lost?
In a recent NYT article, Todd G. Buchholz and Victoria Buchholz, argue “sometime in the past 30 years, someone has hit the brakes and Americans—particularly young Americans—have become risk-aversive and sedentary.

University of New Hampshire management professor Paul Harvey says, GenY has a “very inflated sense of self” that leads to “unrealistic expectations” and “chronic disappointment.” If you want more silly expressions from old farts, read this article:

https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140713132101-1011572-is-gen-y-becoming-the-new-lost-generation?trk=tod-home-art-list-small_1

As for me, I identify very strongly with GenX; the previous ‘loser’ generation. In fact, generation X invented ‘loser.’ (Beck’s amazing anthem and L on the forehead). My birthday lands on the cusp of Baby Boomer and GenX, but I’ve clearly crossed the line into GenX I don’t live for or at my work. I think money isn’t everything. I’m not divorced, live within my means, and as a protest against pop culture, I stopped watching TV many years ago (although I do sometimes watch DVD’s). I had a ‘No Future’ sign on my office door in grad school, and my teachers were worried about it. I told them that with Reagan in office the Doomsday clock (Google it) was only 3 minutes to midnight (1984). And the Boomers complained that GenX was lazy, lost without a future (Ha! He says with bitter sarcasm), GenX can’t compete and they’ll never succeed like we (Boomers) did,

Well the joke is on the Boomers right now; they gradually fade away while GenX is taking over! Our president and I were born only 121 days apart! (My close approach to George Clooney, that’s right girls, is a mere 211 days). Thats right! GenX rules the world. Whole Foods plays GenX music (70′s – 90′s rock) right there in the aisles. As a GenX, I am the demographic for marketers — cause we have all the disposable income! Ha ha! Everyone treats me with respect cause I got a few gray hairs. No one complains about GenX anymore! It turns out that we’re pretty hard working and motivated after all! Ha ha!

So my message to my younger friends is to ignore oldsters who beat up your generation. You’re day will come!

Incidentally, I have a theory. I believe this “lazyness” ritual has been happening since the dawn of humanity. Every generation, so far, has been successful. We’re still around, aren’t we?

I’m not saying that GenY is not lazy. They’re young! This is how young humans are. Remember, the most impt. thing in your life when you’re young (say <30) is to find a partner and make babies. This ain’t easy; it requires a lot of talking, learning, and thinking about love and sex. Young people are too busy fulfilling the demands of their evolutionary drive to reproduce which after all, is a lot more fulfilling than being employee of the month at Starbucks.

 

SPIE Montreal for the GPI team: work, social event and a landslide of papers

One of the walls of GPI-focused papers at #SPIEastro in Montreal on Monday June 23 (credit: M. Perrin)

One of the walls of GPI-focused papers at #SPIEastro in Montreal on Monday June 23 (credit: M. Perrin)

Hello all,

It was an important week for the Gemini Planet Imager Consortium. Several of us met at SPIE Astro in Montreal, Quebec, Canada to present our work on GPI. Katie Morzinski  wrote a blog post describing the GPI -focused events at the conference, so I will briefly give my perspective.

Arriving at Montreal by train. (credit: F. Marchis)

Arriving at Montreal by train. (credit: F. Marchis)

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GPI at SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation

Members of the GPI team recently attended the biennial SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation conference. This time it was in Montreal at the end of June, and you can check out #SPIEastro to find out more about the general topics covered at the conference.

Bruce professing at Jerome’s poster.

After the conference, the presenters write manuscripts on their work and these are published in the Proceedings of SPIE. Last night we had a GPI “paper splash” of SPIE pre-prints at the Astro-ph ArXiv. There are 18 of them — that’s a lot of work from the GPI team! Thanks to Quinn for posting.

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How hills change dunes

ESP_036934_1915_0.38xA piece of Mars: Using dunes to interpret the winds can be a tricky business. Here’s one reason why: most of the dunes here go from the upper left to lower right. But the ones inside the funky oblong crater go from the upper right to the lower left. Why? One of two reasons. Either the rim of the crater rotates the winds that blow inside, or the rim blocks one wind but lets in another that is less effective at making dunes outside. (HiRISE ESP_036934_1915, NASA/JPL/Univ. of Arizona)

An astronomer called Cervantes

This article was originally published in Spanish  in the website of   Fundación madri+d. To access the original version, click here.The English translation was published in OpenMind, an interdisciplinary platform with bilingual articles in Spanish and English by te Fundación BBVA. The English version is here.

On the name of the satellites of Jupiter discovered by Galileo

Miguel de Cervantes died in 1616 a pauper. He is buried in the convent Trinitarians nuns in Madrid, where there is a search now underway for his tomb. As well as his monumental work Don Quixote, which he himself considered the first modern novel, his extensive literary production included poetry and theater. It also appears that his scientific culture must have been considerable, as he kept in touch with the advances that were made at the start of the 17th century following the invention of the telescope. It is even possible that he made a significant scientific contribution, naming the satellites of the planet Jupiter, which were identified when Galileo Galilei, the astronomer from Pisa, pointed the new instrument to the sky.

With the publication of “Sidereus Nuncius” (the Sidereal Messenger) in March 1610, Galileo began a real revolution, not only in astronomy but also in philosophy. He presented solid evidence overturning the interpretations of the world that had been firmly in place for centuries. In his work Galileo shows us an irregular and imperfect moon; he identifies a large number of new stars that are weaker than those seen with the naked eye; he reveals the complex nature of the Milky Way; and he discovers four bodies orbiting Jupiter, delivering a devastating blow to the Ptolemaic cosmology. In successive letters he continued his demolition of the static vision accepted by the Aristotelian orthodoxy. He observed the phases of Venus and the rings of Saturn, without identifying them as such; he also interpreted correctly that the sunspots are real features on the surface of the sun. In these and other discoveries, Galileo became immersed in major controversies that almost cost him his life when he faced the Roman Inquisition (censured in 1616 and condemned in 1633 to permanent house arrest).  One of these disputes, limited to the academic arena and not resolved until the 20th century, involved the German astronomer Simon Marius (the Latin version of the German name Simon Mayr or Mayer), who claimed co-discovery of Jupiter’s satellites and was attacked roundly by Galileo as a result. The alleged plagiarism, accepted for 300 years, was disproved decades ago, although references to it can still be found in some texts. Let’s look at the sequence of events:

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Where is Curiosity on her 1 Mars year anniversary?

ESP_029034_1750_1.0x_MSLA piece of Mars: Curiosity has been trolling around on Mars for one martian year, so I think it’s time I posted an update on where it is and what it’s seeing. Right now (late June 2014), the rover is rolling across meter-sized ripples, heading south toward Mt. Sharp. In the near future there will be even more impressive ripples, and then finally the terrain will start to grow more interesting. I will post more of these in the months to come. (HiRISE ESP_029034_1750, NASA/JPL/Univ. of Arizona)

Gemini Observatory reveals the GPI programs selected for 2014B

Some news from Gemini Observatory,

Gemini Observatory has revealed the list of observing proposals scheduled in 2014B (the second half of 2014)  that will use the GPI instrument. Those programs focused on the search for companions around nearby stars and also stars known to possess a disk and/or a planet by radial velocity. Other groups are using the quality of data provided by GPI to study planets already imaged with previous instruments, such as the HR8799 system and Beta Pic b. Their goal is the study the atmosphere of those planets and also to collect more astrometric positions to refine the orbit of the exoplanet.

Gemini South Telescope on the top of Cerro Pachon (credit: Marshall Perrin)

Gemini South Telescope on the top of Cerro Pachon (credit: Marshall Perrin)

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