Tag Archives: yardangs

That which curves and that which is straight

A Piece of Mars: The long meandering lines snaking across the image (3.2x1.8 km or 2x1.1 mi across) are inverted channels. They are river deposits that once were the lowest part of the landscape (rivers always are), but then the ...

Huge wind-made cliffs

A piece of Mars: Topography in color is draped over an image of a windblown cliff. The entire shape of the landscape here was formed by wind, from the large 400 m (1312 ft) tall zigzag cliff, to the small ...

Missing bedrock

A piece of Mars: Wind flow on Mars can be quite dramatic. Here, a single wind-sculpted hill stands 1.5 km (0.93 mi) wide and 600 m (1970 ft) high (color shows elevation). That sounds big, but vastly larger is the ...

Which wind came first?

A piece of Mars: This scene (3.9x2.5 km or 2.4x1.6 mi) shows a surface carved by two different winds: one blowing from the right and one blowing from the bottom right. They've formed overlapping sets of streamlined rocks called yardangs. ...

The always-changing landscape

A piece of Mars: Over time, windblown sand can wear down a surface. This isn't so common on Earth, where water, ice, and life are more likely to change the landscape, but it's typical of many places on Mars. Here, ...

Flow

A piece of Mars: This is a bit of the flank of Arsia Mons, one of Mars' great volcanoes. The big changes in topography are ancient relics of erosion by lava and great tectonic pulling. What I like is that ...

How we know wind blows down Olympus Mons’ flanks

A piece of Mars: It's similar to my last post, but I love these wind tails. This is a tiny bit of the eastern slope of the gigantic volcano, Olympus Mons. The dusty surface has been covered by boulders (the ...

Uniquely martian

A piece of Mars: Now here's something that, as far as I know, can safely be labeled as "uniquely martian". These dunes (or maybe they're ripples) are ~25 m wide, and have formed from winds blowing from the upper left. ...

Mars’ fleets of rock “boats”

A piece of Mars: Where the wind blows strong and there's a lot of sand, the surface gets scoured. Some bits of the ground, called yardangs, are more resistant and stick around: they take on shapes elongated in the direction ...

Cloaked rocks

A Piece of Mars: These rocks look like hooded figures from some dark fantasy story. European standing stones should be jealous, they don't typically get a shroud of dark sand to add to their mystery and etch them into beguiling ...