Post-observing report of the VLT Paranal and Pictures

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Hello,
This morning when I woke up I had a post-observing report from Herve Bouy, the observer for our run (see my previous post), summarizing the night of observation at Paranal. It went very smoothly and the weather got better during the night. 
All Sky camera image recorded during our night of observation

All Sky camera image recorded during our night of observation

This is an image taken with the all sky camera (called Mascot for Mini All Sky Cloud Observation Tool) which showed the entire sky over Paranal. As you can see there were no clouds at all :-) The wind died after 4 UT and the seeing (quality of sky) improved significantly reaching ~0.5″ in visible light. This is important for us since adaptive optics systems provide a better correction when the atmosphere turbulence effect is lower. It seems to have been a very good night of observations. Let’s see what the data tell us about the distortion of the detector, the goal of our observing run.

 

 

 

 

Herve Bouy also authorized me to share with you a few pictures that it took before the run. Enjoy!

Global view of the four 8m telescopes which composed the Very Large Telescope on the top of Paranal (Credit Herve Bouy)

Global view of the four 8m telescopes which composed the Very Large Telescope on the top of Paranal (Credit Herve Bouy)

Surrounding landscape at Paranal at sunset (credit: Herve Bouy)

Surrounding landscape at Paranal seen at sunset (credit Herve Bouy)

 

One of the 8m telescope (UT4/Yepun?), its primary mirror and the structure of the telescope (credit Herve Bouy)

One of the 8m telescope (UT4/Yepun?), its primary mirror and the structure of the telescope (credit Herve Bouy)

Have a great Thursday,
F.

About Franck Marchis

Dr. Franck Marchis is a Senior Researcher and Chair of the Exoplanet Group at the Carl Sagan Center of the SETI Institute since July 2007. Over the past 19 years, he has dedicated his research to the study of our solar system, specifically the search for asteroids with moons, using mainly ground-based telescopes equipped with adaptive optics. More recently he has been also involved in the definition of new generation of AOs for 8 -10 m class telescopes and future Extremely Large Telescopes. He has developed algorithms to process and enhance the quality of images, both astronomical and biological. His currently involved in the Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey, which consists in imaging exoplanets using an extreme AO system for the Gemini South telescope. This new instrument is be capable of imaging and recording spectra of young Jupiter-like exoplanets orbiting around nearby stars.

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