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On Mars, the wind wins

A piece of Mars: This scene (600x450 m or 1969x1476 ft) is covered in small craters, formed by the splash of a larger crater nearby. They cover everything, even the bright ripples visible on the right. So the ripples ...

Hello from AAS!

Happy new year, Internet! I'm starting off the year at the 225th meeting of the American Astronomical Society. It's an annual conference where all the professional astronomers in the United States get together and talk about space! There's been some ...

MAHLI landscapes

I just... felt like putting up a pretty picture from MAHLI, the microscopic imager on Curiosity. This is image 0817MH0003250050301497E01_DXXX, taken Nov. 23, 2014 (sol 817). The camera mainly takes closeup images of rocks, but it's also good for a ...

One Year Anniversary, part 2

To follow up to Jason's post, here's a photo of our summit team today - much reduced in numbers here in person from a year ago, but this is just the tip of the GPI team iceberg, and we were ...

One Year Anniversary

One year ago, GPI saw its first starlight on the night of November 11-12, 2013. In the year since that, the GPI team has been very busy. We've detected our first exoplanet, had a series of commissioning runs, took the SPIE ...

Gemini, GPI, and a new friend

The GPIES Exoplanet Survey has begun!  But that's a different post.  For now, here are some photos of these great beautiful machines.  As we came up to the domes after dinner tonight, we had a visitor overhead, circling around and, ...

A way through

A piece of Mars: Wind ha blown the dark, rippled sand between jagged hills, from top to bottom in this frame (663 m or 2175 ft across). Regardless of the terrain, sand finds a way to get through -- just ...

Mars is watching you…

A piece of Mars: This looks like a pair of eyes looking at us. It's really some small brown hills, two of which (the "eyes") are surrounded by dark gray sand that has blown into scours as the wind interacts ...

Martian waves

A piece of Mars: The swirly candy stripes in these big dark dunes are layers inside that have been made visible by wind erosion (the scene is 1.5x0.9 km, or 0.93x0.56 mi). It's rare to see the inside structure of ...

Kardashev Type III civilizations could be rare

These two papers by J.T. Wright's group were posted today on astro-ph The Ĝ Infrared Search for Extraterrestrial Civilizations with Large Energy Supplies. I. Background and Justification J. T. Wright, B. Mullan, S. Sigurðsson, M. S. Povich http://arxiv.org/abs/1408.1133 The Ĝ Infrared Search for Extraterrestrial Civilizations with Large Energy Supplies. II. ...