Entourage

Here’s a grand dune, making its stately way northward under winds blowing mainly from the south-southeast (bottom to top), with a secondary wind blowing from the southwest (lower left to upper right). There are two rippled and sharp-crested slip faces on this dune — can you identify both of them (hint: each wind creates one

Squish! 💦

This isn’t a full blog post. Just something I saw while looking around for other things on Mars. And for once it’s (probably) not related to the wind. But it’s cool enough to share. I saw something that went “squish” 💦 : HiRISE ESP_035789_2175, NASA/JPL/Univ. of Arizona This is a ~1.2 km (0.75 mi) wide

Flow. Lots of flow.

Over the years, many things have flowed across the surface of Mars: lava, ice, water, and wind. Two things have flowed in this image (the view is 0.75×0.6 km or 0.47×0.37 mi): Image credit: HiRISE ESP_026541_1840, NASA/JPL/Univ. of Arizona If you know my blog at all, then you might recognize the big structures as yardangs.

Wind-exposed layers

Wind-exposed layers
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On Earth, layers comprising the geological record of an area are most often exposed by fluvial erosion, as a river cuts through rock (a typical example is the Grand Canyon). On Mars, fluvial channels are not so common (especially in the past few billion years). But the wind has relentlessly worked away at the surface,

Dune trails

There’s so much going on in this 0.75×0.75 km (0.47×0.47 mi) image. You’re looking at a broad dune migrating toward the upper right. It’s early summer, but this is close enough to the north pole that some winter ice lingers (pale blueish white), amid slumps that have shed down from the dune. The slumps probably