Category: HiRISE images

HiRISE images

Summery dune

A piece of Mars: Last December I blogged about a picture of a sand dune taken in early northern spring. This is the same dune, without frost, now that summer has come to the northern hemisphere and all the frost ...

How hills change dunes

A piece of Mars: Using dunes to interpret the winds can be a tricky business. Here's one reason why: most of the dunes here go from the upper left to lower right. But the ones inside the funky oblong crater ...

Where is Curiosity on her 1 Mars year anniversary?

A piece of Mars: Curiosity has been trolling around on Mars for one martian year, so I think it's time I posted an update on where it is and what it's seeing. Right now (late June 2014), the rover is ...

In the lee

A piece of Mars: This crater (290 m or 950 ft across) is crawling with all sorts of ripples and dunes. The wind mainly blows from the top to the bottom of the frame, and it is responsible for the ...

Whither the wind

A piece of Mars: Which way did the wind blow here? You can tell by looking at the dune and its ripples. The slip face (the avalanching slope of the dune) faces downwind, so the strongest wind here mainly blows ...

The always-changing landscape

A piece of Mars: Over time, windblown sand can wear down a surface. This isn't so common on Earth, where water, ice, and life are more likely to change the landscape, but it's typical of many places on Mars. Here, ...

Flow

A piece of Mars: This is a bit of the flank of Arsia Mons, one of Mars' great volcanoes. The big changes in topography are ancient relics of erosion by lava and great tectonic pulling. What I like is that ...

Debunking Hoagland’s “Glass Worms” with HiRISE

A piece of Mars: Several years ago, a guy named Richard Hoagland claimed that some parallel linear features on Mars looked like the ridges of a transparent earthworm, calling these things "glass worms". Phil Plait debunked it nicely, but Hoagland ...

How we know wind blows down Olympus Mons’ flanks

A piece of Mars: It's similar to my last post, but I love these wind tails. This is a tiny bit of the eastern slope of the gigantic volcano, Olympus Mons. The dusty surface has been covered by boulders (the ...

The wind giveth and the wind taketh away

A piece of Mars: In the center of this image is a 270 m crater (885 ft) that was nearly buried, along with the surrounding terrain, by dust. Since then, wind from the upper left has scoured the dust deposit, ...